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Wellbeing Wednesday – Follow your Inner Moonlight

As Pablo Picaso famously said, “All children are born artists. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.” As a general rule, children don’t believe they’re poor at doing something until someone tells them they are. I’ve heard it time and again in childhood development classes and seen it in real life. I’ve cited my husband’s example of believing he wasn’t creative or artistic for years after a disparaging comment from a family member several times (most recently in my post on teaching the value of handmade). I’ve also experienced it first-hand. It’s difficult to keep creating when your efforts have been met with criticism or even just disinterest. Today’s printable is to help encourage you whenever you’re feeling afraid to create or to take a chance:

follow your inner moonlight watercolor printable

The full quotation is “Follow your inner moonlight; don’t hide the madness” and it’s attributed to poet Allen Ginsberg. If you want to know the full story behind the quotation and where it came from, The Allen Ginsberg Project did some great investigative journalism, as it were, that you can find right here along with an even more full version of the quotation. As always, this free printable is available in the ‘printables for subscribers‘ portion of the blog. Not a member yet? Just sign up using the post below this post! And if you really like this design, you can find it on a variety of items in my Society6 store.

I hope that today, and every day, you chose to let your inner moonlight shine. Because, as Dr. Seuss said (and because today is apparently the day for lots of quotations!) “There is no one alive who is youer than you.”

 Natasha of The Artisan Life-01

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{ 8 comments… add one }
  • Sarah March 16, 2018, 09:00

    I hear things like this all the time as a music teacher – people who have been written off musically at the age of 5 because of some snobby music teacher. So frustrating! I love the quote printable btw.

    • Natasha March 23, 2018, 08:50

      It’s so sad when things like that happen. I know I’ll have to keep the lesson in mind when my girl is older so I don’t accidentally say something discouraging!

  • Pamela Baker March 17, 2018, 04:31

    Since my youngest was about 2, I knew he had a talent for art. In Pre-K the teachers would complain that he would use too many colors and would his own pictures! Of course I was proud of him. Well 30 yrs later, his artist is selling in various shows around NYC – and his name and work is noticed by many famous artists (including Banksy!) who he was with Banksy’s Team the other night. So I agree never block anyone’s early talent!

    • Natasha March 17, 2018, 18:01

      That’s crazy that his teachers would complain that he used too many colors! I’m so glad you son had a supportive family and followed his desire to create. =)

  • Duni March 17, 2018, 05:24

    I still remember that awful remark my art-teacher in high school made about one of my paintings in front of the entire class. In my opinion it was one of my best pieces actually.

    • Natasha March 23, 2018, 08:54

      That’s so sad. Negative comments really do tend to stick in the mind and they can impact people for so long. It’s especially horrible when it happens with creative endeavors because it’s all so subjective.

  • Julie March 21, 2018, 22:38

    There is so much truth to this!! I can’t draw or paint to save my life, but hey, I’m sure someone told Jackson Pollock his paint splatters wasn’t art! Ooh, love this quote! I love Ginsberg!

    • Natasha March 23, 2018, 08:58

      I was actually a little nervous that people wouldn’t know who Ginsberg was! Art is so subjective. A couple weeks ago I saw a piece from an artist I like on Pinterest. Someone had written a caption that it was “ugly art, but an interesting idea.”

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