14 responses

  1. Paige @ Little Nostalgia
    April 25, 2013

    This is so interesting! I don’t work with a lot of raw metal myself (and I really like the darker tones anyway), but this is good to know if I ever decide to branch out.

    • Natashalh
      April 25, 2013

      I was kind of nervous about metal for a while, but then I discovered I love it! I actually prefer to clean the fire scale and then patina items. That was I can control the darkening. It feels a little funny sometimes to clean something just to grunge it up, but hey.

  2. Trina (Trina’s Clay Creations)
    April 25, 2013

    Oh wow, this is so cool, thank you for sharing!

    • Natashalh
      April 25, 2013

      Thanks! I know not everyone works with metal, but I love sharing ways to DIY instead of buy!

  3. Rose
    April 25, 2013

    Wow, I learned so much from this tutorial! Thanks for putting together such a detailed explanation of your technique.

    • Natashalh
      April 25, 2013

      Sometimes I feel like I go a little overboard, but I find tutorials without details or photos to be really frustrating!

  4. Tammy
    December 1, 2013

    I recently started lampworking to create glass beads using a hot torch. I noticed some of my glass beads have tiny, unintended bubbles, which I think ruins the beads. Some people say the bubbles make the beads look unique, but I don’t like it.
    After some research I found that, basically, the bubbles are caused by the glass rods being dirty and need to be cleaned before using them. A lampworking website blogger suggests using a jewelers picking solution made with ‘a stable form of sulphuric acid,’ which I’m not too comfortable with — I wanted something more eco-friendly.
    Thank you for taking the time to find a natural pickling recipe. I’m going to try your formula to see if this makes a difference in my glass beads. I’ll send you a follow-up to let you know how things turned out.

    • Natashalh
      December 2, 2013

      I have no idea if it will help with the beads, but it might. It would definitely cut through any sort of residual oils! I really want to get into lamp work beads, but I don’t have a kiln and I don’t know of one I could use to finish up the process. I really hope this works out for you!!

  5. Kelly Hudson
    January 30, 2014

    Now does this easy recipe work for not turning your skin green or black? I am making bullet casing necklace and earrings, i just need something that will prevent that from happening. Thanks for the help ahead of time.

    • Natashalh
      January 30, 2014

      Unfortunately, that is a natural reaction many people have to copper. The recipe will remove any grime, but copper always has the potential to be reactive. What I recommend is sealing the casings with Renaissance Wax. It’s a museum-grade sealant that I use on my jewelry to protect the metal and the wearer’s skin!

  6. Kelsey Albrecht-Carruthers
    March 9, 2014

    This is great! I was looking for something like this for my Etsy Shop’s sterling silver rings, and it works amazingly! Thank you!!!

    • Natashalh
      March 9, 2014

      Awesome! I’m so glad it works for you. I use it for my Etsy shop items, too. =)

  7. maria
    July 3, 2014

    this is fantastic- just a little confused- i make sterling silver jewelry and not sure what the peroxide is for?

    • Natashalh
      July 3, 2014

      It’s only needed if you get other things in there contaminating the mixture. If you only use sterling and have the appropriate tongs, you won’t need it. If you add nickel silver, for example, to the pot, it will cause the detritus to basically electroplate to your other metals! Peroxide takes care of that.

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